Monthly Archives: September 2011

Denglish 26: Taking A Trip to the Big Apple? Don’t Worry About the Little Things.

Anticipating our trip to New York back in 2010, I was worried something might go wrong to prevent us from fully enjoying our vacation. I shared with my wife how much it would suck if our bags were lost. What it our flights were cancelled? What if one of our family members got really sick?

THE WIFE: “I hope everybody stays alive until we get to New York.”

(Apparently, my wife would not have been terribly inconvenienced if, upon our arrival at JFK, our loved ones all marched gleefully into Death’s cold embrace.)

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Denglish 25: A German Wife Uses Google Chat Emoticons to Defeat Her American Husband

In Google Chat, you can type “<3″ and a little heart will jump to life in your chat window, conveying love and affection to your conversational partner. Of course, all your good intentions go right out the window when you’re typing with an ΓΌber-competitive German woman:

ME: “I love you! <3 <3 <3!”

THE WIFE: “<3 x 100! What do you say now? :) “

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Denglish 24: What Do You Call A Flip Book (Stop Motion Animation) in German?

I once described flip books to my wife; an animation method using sequential pictures drawn on pads of paper. By flipping each page in rapid succession, you can create simple, 2D movies. She had this to say about it:

THE WIFE: “It is like Thumb Kino!”

(Apparently, “kino” means “cinema” in German.)

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